Gazebo Makeover

Gazebo Makeover

Since this blog is called WhatGodDoes, it may seem odd to find home improvement ideas, but as Rob Bell says, “Everything is spiritual.” If your eyes and ears are open, you find spiritual truths in the most unlikely places.  I’ll write more about this in an upcoming blog post.  But for now, here’s how we gave our gazebo a makeover for under $700!

hot tub

We inherited this hot tub when we moved in. I get overheated easily in a hot tub, and Tim doesn’t really like hot tubs, so we decided to get rid of it. The jets worked, but the water didn’t warm up. I put it on Craigslist for free, and a nice gentleman came and picked it up within a week. He said he was going to fix it and give it to his mother-in-law.

 

rattan furniture

I found this nice set of rattan furniture on Craigslist for 100$. I’ll be sending a link to this blog post to the couple who sold it to us. The wife wanted to be rid of it, since it had been collecting dust in their garage for a long time. The husband was a little disappointed to see it go. He and his brother used to crawl underneath and play. They remember their dad sitting in “his favorite chair” (the one with the ottoman). I discarded the dated cushions and tore out the leather straps, which were pretty dried out. Other than that and some fading, this set is awesome, very sturdy, and it has lots of mid-century character (from the 1950s!).

 

rattan furniture

This image shows what the furniture looked like before I gave it a thorough scrubbing with some Murphy’s Oil Soap.

 

rattan furniture

This image shows the rattan furniture after the dirt and stains are removed. I also added a few light coats of polyurethane to protect it from moisture and renew its shine.

outdoor cushion

I ordered some new cushions online at World Market. Their prices were very reasonable compared to every other website. The one problem: The cushions only came in one size, which was slightly bigger than the size I needed. I decided to modify the couch base by attaching 1x4s on the bottom of each piece (the couch was three separate pieces). This allowed for the extra inches so the cushions didn’t look too crowded. For the chair, I just pushed the cushion in place, and it didn’t look weird. The ottoman was another story, though. I had to take the removable cover off and slice about 2 inches off of two sides. I reattached the batting and gave it a little stitch here and there to keep it in place. Later in the blog you’ll see what I did about the cover.

 

painted floor

The place where the hot tub used to be was a different color than the surrounding area of floor, even after Tim pressure washed it. We bought an indoor/outdoor rug to cover the unsightly floor, but because of a slight dip toward the back end of the gazebo, there was a place that held water for several days. We decided to use the rug inside, in the room where people most often enter the house after having been in the swimming pool. Tim painted the cement and used a leaf blower to dry faster between coats. We were able to walk on it about two hours after the final (3rd) coat.

drop cloth no sew curtains

Instead of spending 45$ per panel on outdoor canvas curtains, I bought ten 6×9 drop cloths, some hooks to go in the gazebo frame, and some clipping rings. This was an idea I saw all over the web. The genius homemaking guru who originally thought of this deserves kudos. In this image, my husband is drilling pilot holes and inserting the hooks.

For each 6x9 drop cloth, I used seven curtain clip loops.  I didn't worry about measuring perfectly.  I just put one on the left, one on the right, and then folded the loops together to find the mid-point.  For the remaining four pieces, I put two between the left and middle and two between right and middle.

For each 6×9 drop cloth, I used seven curtain clip loops. I didn’t worry about measuring perfectly. I just put one on the left, one on the right, and then folded the loops together to find the mid-point. For the remaining four pieces, I put two between the left and middle and two between right and middle.

 

I've seen where you can create pleats by folding the drop cloth, but I like the loose, lazy look shown in this image.

I’ve seen where you can create pleats by folding the drop cloth, but I like the loose, lazy look shown in this image.

 

Notice how the drop cloth is folded down on the top to create a valance.  Another perk of this technique is that you can easily adjust the height of the curtain.  As I mentioned earlier, the floor of our gazebo is a little bit uneven, and if I were to have purchased standard curtain panels, I would have had to sew a new hem on a few of them.

Notice how the drop cloth is folded down on the top to create a valance. Another perk of this technique is that you can easily adjust the height of the curtain. As I mentioned earlier, the floor of our gazebo is a little bit uneven, and if I were to have purchased standard curtain panels, I would have had to sew a new hem on a few of them.

 

This is the fabric for the curtain tie-backs.  I used pins to mark where I would cut.  I used the width of the stitch witchery and then added an extra inch.

This is the fabric for the curtain tie-backs. I used pins to mark where I would cut. I used the width of the stitch witchery and then added an extra inch.

 

After I cut the the tie-backs, I ironed them by about 1/2 inch on each side.

After I cut the the tie-backs, I ironed them by about 1/2 inch on each side.

 

If forgot to take a picture of the crease I ironed down the middle.  This made placing the stitch witchery along the fold easier to do.

If forgot to take a picture of the crease I ironed down the middle. This made placing the stitch witchery along the fold easier to do.

 

Once I was sure everything was in place, I pinned it every six inches or so.

Once I was sure everything was in place, I pinned it every six inches or so.

 

First, I pressed the iron in the areas between the pins.  After the material cooled a little bit, I removed the pins and ironed there.

First, I pressed the iron in the areas between the pins. After the material cooled a little bit, I removed the pins and ironed there.

 

This image shows the finished tie-back with a mini clip ring.  I put clips on both ends for convenience.

This image shows the finished tie-back with a mini clip ring. I put clips on both ends for convenience.

 

I didn't want to be bothered with covering the ottoman cushion, so I just bought enough fabric to fold the cushion like a present.  This will be convenient to remove, wash, and replace.

I didn’t want to be bothered with covering the ottoman cushion, so I just bought enough fabric (1/2 price at JoAnn’s!)  to fold the cushion like a present. This will be convenient to remove, wash, and replace.

 

The cushion fits so snuggly into the frame that I know the fabric won't shift.

The cushion fits so snuggly into the frame that I know the fabric won’t shift.

I used the material that previously cover the ottoman cushion (before I trimmed the cushion down) and some stitch witchery to make this throw pillow.  Sorry, I didn't make a tutorial on the pillow.  It's not that I didn't want to; I just got in the creative zone and completely forgot to take pictures.

I used the material that previously covered the ottoman cushion (before I trimmed the cushion down) and some stitch witchery to make this throw pillow. Sorry, I didn’t make a tutorial on the pillow. It’s not that I didn’t want to; I just got in the creative zone and completely forgot to take pictures.

 

This is the other side of the same pillow.  As you can see, the pillow is reversible.  I can just untie it and retie it on the other side.  Other than a few hand-sewn stitches to reinforce the ties, this pillow is held by heavy duty stitch witchery.

This is the other side of the same pillow. As you can see, the pillow is reversible. I can just untie it and retie it on the other side. Other than a few hand-sewn stitches to reinforce the ties, this pillow is held by heavy duty stitch witchery.

 

I found this adorable frog pillow and bird pillow (next image) at the garden section of Lowes. The grey matches the painted floor.

I found this adorable frog pillow and bird pillow (next image) at the garden section of Lowes. The grey matches the painted floor.

 

bird

I have no idea why, but at Lowe's garden center, the plant pots that have plants in them are less expensive than the empty plant pots.  Weird, huh?  On the couch behind the plant you can see the other pillow I made.

I have no idea why, but at Lowe’s garden center, the plant pots that have plants in them are less expensive than the empty plant pots. Weird, huh? On the couch behind the plant you can see the other pillow I made.

 

The furniture set came with end tables, which we positioned on either side of the couch.  I got one bamboo plant for each table.  They were very reasonably priced, pots included.

The furniture set came with end tables, which we positioned on either side of the couch. I got one bamboo plant for each table. They were very reasonably priced, pots included.

 

For some reason, I have a hard time keeping ferns alive.  If this one doesn't make it, I'll just get a fake one.

For some reason, I have a hard time keeping ferns alive. If this one doesn’t make it, I’ll just get a fake one.

 

Every time Tim walks by, he hits his head on this! (And there's another one just like it on the right side.) Yep, he hits his head on that one, too.

Every time Tim walks by, he hits his head on this! (And there’s another one just like it on the right side.) Yep, he hits his head on that one, too.

 

We got this plaque when Tim's dad, Richard, passed away.  It used to be under the magnolia tree, but for some reason the dogs liked to pee on it, and it just didn't feel right to leave it there.  So it's been sitting here and there, looking for a home.  We finally found the perfect place for it, in the bottom portion of the coffee table (which spins, BTW).  It looks as if it were supposed to be there, custom made from the get-go.  You can be sure that when I write my follow-up blog post, I'll have something to say about this.

We got this plaque when Tim’s dad, Richard, passed away. It used to be under the magnolia tree, but for some reason the dogs liked to pee on it, and it just didn’t feel right to leave it there. So it’s been sitting here and there, looking for a home. We finally found the perfect place for it, in the bottom portion of the coffee table (which spins, BTW). It looks as if it were supposed to be there, custom made from the get-go. You can be sure that when I write my follow-up blog post, I’ll have something to say about this.

At this point, I’ll leave off the image captions and let the pics speak for themselves.  All we have left to do is hanging the lights.  (I’ll post a night pic later; be sure to check back soon.) Ta-da!

from-right

 

gazebo no sew drop cloth curtains

interior2

interior3

gazebo

Comments
  • Stephen Helbig March 11, 2014 at 2:00 am

    Ta-da! ~ Faith in Action ~ Thank Offering

    p.s. ~ Ta-da ~ Transliteration: Hebrew “todah” ~ By way of application in Psalms and elsewhere “todah” was used for thanking God for things not yet recieved as well as for things already at hand.

    p.s.s. ~ Jeremiah 33:10 “Thus says the LORD, ‘Yet again there will be heard in this place, of which you say, “It is a waste, without man and without beast,” that is, in the cities of Judah and in the streets of Jerusalem that are desolate, without man and without inhabitant and without beast, (11) the voice of joy and the voice of gladness, the voice of the bridegroom and the voice of the bride, the voice of those who say, “Give thanks to the LORD of hosts, For the LORD is good, For His lovingkindness is everlasting”; and of those who bring a “THANK OFFERING” [“Hebrew ~ Todah”; “(Ta-Da)” “(the sacrifice of praise)”] into the house of the LORD. For I will restore the fortunes of the land as they were at first,’ says the LORD. (12) “Thus says the LORD of hosts, ‘There will again be in this place which is waste, without man or beast, and in all its cities, a habitation of shepherds who rest their flocks.…

    p.s.s.t. ~ Alice & Tim, ~ Very creative, ~ and IT Looks ~ Beautiful! ~ 🙂 Ta-Da!

    • admin March 11, 2014 at 5:11 pm

      Oh my gosh you always find the most interesting tid bits! I enjoy reading your comments.

      • Lanny A. Eichert March 12, 2014 at 12:56 am

        Much like oh my god, or the shortened form omg, oh my gosh can also be condensed into omg, and thus people will have no idea whether you are talking about god or gosh. However, angry Christians who hate to use the Lord’s name in vain, usually type oh my gosh online, rather than oh my god.

        http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=oh%20my%20gosh

        Fits the discription of you perfectly even if it uses the word Christian extremely loosely and liberally.

        • Stephen Helbig March 15, 2014 at 7:03 pm

          OMG ~ WOW ~ “GAZEBO REST” ~ (Notice; The Greek word for the love of God is agape from the word, agoo, meaning to lead like a shepherd guides his sheep, and pao, meaning to rest. ~ Alice what a wonderful creation given ~ OMG GIVE A THANK OFFERING ~ OH MY GOD ~ OMG ~ GAZEBO ~ Its like you just won the lottery! Gazebo! ~ A habitation for shepherds who rest their flocks (see above scripture Jeremiah 33:10-12)

          p.s. ~ We’ll meet up under the gazebo.
          To the hut thing!

          p.s.s. ~ OMG ~ And so we know and rely on the love God has for us. God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in them. (1 Jn 4:16)

          p.s.s.t ~ 1 Corinthians Chapter 13 (Mirror Bible)(Toit, Francois Du [2014-01-08]. Mirror Bible: A selection of key New Testament texts paraphrased from the Greek. Mirror Word Publishing.

          LOVE IS WHO YOU ARE! 13:1 Speaking in tongues is not the point; 1love is. It is neither angelic eloquence, nor the mastery of human language that persuades. It doesn’t matter how poetic, prophetic, or profound I may sound; my conversation is reduced to the hollow noise of clanging brass cymbals if love’s echo is absent. (The Greek word for the love of God is 1agape from the word, agoo, meaning to lead like a shepherd guides his sheep, and pao, meaning to rest, i.e. “he leads me beside still waters.” By the waters of reflection my soul remembers who I am. [Ps 23]. God’s rest is established upon his image and likeness redeemed in us. Thus, to encounter agape is to remember who I am. Jesus the Savior of humankind rescued God’s image and likeness in human form. The grace of God shines as bright as day making the salvation of humankind undeniably visible [Titus 2:11].) 13:2 I could predict the future in detail and have a word of knowledge for everyone. I could possess amazing faith, and prove it by moving mountains! It doesn’t make me any more important than anyone else. Love is who you are! You are not defined by your gift or deeds. (Love gives context to faith. Moving mountains is not the point, love is.) 13:3 Love is not about defending a point of view; even if I am prepared to give away everything I have and die a martyr’s death; love does not have to prove itself by acts of supreme devotion or self sacrifice! 13:4 Love is large in being passionate about life and relentlessly patient in bearing the offenses and injuries of others with kindness. Love is completely content and strives for nothing. Love has no desire to make others feel inferior and has no need to sing its own praises. 13:5 Love is predictable and does not behave out of character. Love is not ambitious. Love is not 1spiteful and gets no mileage out of another’s mistakes. (The word, 1paroxuno, translates as spiteful, it has no sharp edges.) 13:6 Love sees no joy in injustice. Love’s delight is in everything that truth celebrates. 13:7 Love is a fortress where everyone feels protected rather than exposed! Love’s persuasion is persistent! Love believes. Love never loses hope and always remains constant in contradiction. 13:8 Love never loses its altitude! (The word, ekpipto, means to lose height, to stop soaring.)Prophecies will cease (just like when a placenta is discarded after a baby is born). Tongues will pause (so that which was spoken will be fully interpreted). The quest for knowledge will be inappropriate when perfection is grasped. 13:9 What we perceived in prophetic glimpses 13:10 is now concluded in completeness! (Hebrews 1:1-2, Throughout ancient times God spoke in many fragments and glimpses of prophetic thought to our fathers. Now, the sum total of his conversation with man has finally culminated in a son. He is the official heir of all things. He is, after all, the author of the ages. Jesus is what has been on the tip of the Father’s tongue all along! [The revelation of man’s redeemed sonship, as revealed in Jesus, is the crescendo of God’s conversation with man. Throughout the ages he has whispered his name in disguise to be revealed in the fullness of time as the greatest surprise. The exact image of God, his very likeness, the authentic eternal thought became voice and was made flesh in us.]) 13:11 When I was an 1infant I spoke infant gibberish with the mind of an infant; my reasoning also was typical of an infant; how it all changed when I became a man! I am an infant no more! (The word, 1nepios, means without any command of speech.) 13:12 There was a time of 1suspense, when everything we saw was merely mirrored in the prophetic word, like in an enigma; but then (when I became a man in the revelation of Christ) I gaze face-to-face; behold, I am in him! Now I may know even as I have always been known! (The word, 1arti, comes from airo, meaning to keep in suspense. “I knew you before I formed you in your mother’s womb!“[Jer 1:5]) 13:13 1Now persuasion and every pleasurable 2expectation is completed in agape (where my soul remembers who I am!). Agape is the superlative of everything faith and 2hope always knew to be true about me! Love defines my 3eternal moment! (The word, 1nun, means now, not arti, which means a time of suspense; 2elpis, means hope, pleasant expectation; and 3meno, means to continue to be present.)

          • Lanny A. Eichert March 17, 2014 at 1:19 am

            Stephen, expound love all you want and be a clanging cymbol, but Holiness doesn’t produce the vain vulgar language you produce on this site as you continually disobey God’s precepts.

  • Sean Dean March 11, 2014 at 2:54 am

    super job Alice! That’s really, really nice.

  • Mary Vanderplas March 11, 2014 at 6:19 am

    Wow! What a lovely (and functional) transformation – and how amazing that it cost less than $700 to do. I’m impressed by your ability to envision this new thing and by your creative talents in making it so. (I’m guessing that you had fun imagining and doing this, given your flair for all things creative.)

    Thanks for sharing the pictures along with detailed descriptions. I enjoyed seeing and reading about the step-by-step process of bringing about this “new creation.”

    • admin March 11, 2014 at 5:09 pm

      Thanks, Mary. I did have a lot of fun with this project.

  • Angie Crews August 19, 2016 at 7:06 am

    Love your gazebo makeover! I use the drop cloths as curtains as well at my special events venue to cover the ends of the hay stalls so that during an event you could not see lawn mowers, tractors, etc inside and they work great. I love you clips better than mine and would like to know where you purchased them from. I have curtains all over my venue made of a couple of different fabrics and love your ideas. Awesome Job!

    • Alice Spicer August 26, 2016 at 12:49 am

      Oh I think I forgot to include that I purchased the clips at Joann Fabric. Thanks for your comment. I enjoyed doing this makeover and have really put the gazebo to good use in the late fall, winter, and early spring (the rest of the year it’s just really uncomfortably hot here in FL).

  • Michelle Packham September 10, 2016 at 3:42 pm

    I’m using your idea of drop cloths for my patio. I also have lattice that the previous owner had fastened to the fence. How did you fasten the lattice to your project? Behind the curtains and on the front or back of the posts?

    • Alice Spicer September 12, 2016 at 6:08 pm

      My father-in-law did the lattice work. I would ask him for specifics, but he passed away. Looks to me like he screwed the lattice to the posts on both the front and the back. Hope this helps.

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