Love Wins

Book Review: Francis Chan’s Erasing Hell

Book Review: Francis Chan’s Erasing Hell

Given the title, back cover, and introduction of the book, unsuspecting readers might assume Francis Chan’s book, Erasing Hell, is about, well, erasing Hell. It is anything but that. I wrote a blog, 5 Observations on Let’s-Talk-Later-People, a while back about an interview I watched in which Chan and his expert buddy, Preston Sprinkle, give some background about why they wrote the book. It basically started as a response to Rob Bell’s book, Love Wins, and then turned into something else. In Christianity Today’s article, Q&A: Francis Chan on Rob Bell and Hell, Mark Galli asked Chan, “Why did you write a book just on hell? It’s only one chapter in Bell’s book.”

What I Like about Chan’s Attitude

What I Like about Chan’s Attitude

What I like about Chan’s attitude: He is genuine and transparent in his willingness to explain his inner conflict regarding eternal torment. If I were to name every time Chan made a statement similar to the one below, quoting interviews, sermons, and his book, this would be a very long blog. Chan writes: “Even as I write this paragraph, I feel sick. I would love to erase hell from the pages of Scripture. […] Until recently, whenever the idea of hell – and the idea of my loved ones possibly heading there – crossed my mind, I would brush it aside and divert my thinking to something more pleasant…”

Why Chan Can’t Erase Hell: Jesus Didn’t Get the Memo

Chan’s argument, as is stated in chapter three, “What Jesus Actually Said About Hell,” of his book, Erasing Hell, is as follows: “Jesus grew up in the world of beliefs described in the last chapter. He would be expected to believe the same stuff about hell that most Jews did. And if He didn’t – if Jesus rejected the widespread Jewish belief in hell – then He would certainly need to be clear about this. That last line is very important. Better read it again.” In other words, if Jesus did not agree with the view of hell presented in the last chapter, then He would have had to deliberately and clearly argue against it.

5 Observations on Let’s-Talk-Later-People

I was given a gift I totally didn’t deserve, that is, “a spirit of wisdom and revelation in the recognition of him, the eyes of [my] understanding being enlightened, for [my] knowing what is the hope of His calling, […] riches of the glory” in Jesus Christ, the Savior of the…

The Dispossessed

For my Science Fiction Literature class at UCF, we were assigned a book to read every two weeks.  Most of the books were interesting in one way or another, but none of them could hold a candle to The Dispossessed, by Ursula K. LeGuin.  An excellent book which I highly…

Does God Command Us to Do the Impossible?

As an old friend says, regarding paradoxical subject matter, this will “scramble your eggs” or as someone else said (I can’t remember who), it is a “logical pretzel.”  Free Will + God’s Sovereignty = Confused People.  Why is that?  What’s the problem?  The Introduction of R.C. Sproul’s book, Willing to…

Holy, Holy, Holy God and Ugly, Ugly, Ugly Sin

Woe is me… This is the last in a series I have written in response to various reviews of Rob Bell’s book Love Wins.  In this blog I will address the holiness of God, and whether there is post-mortem hope for those who do not know Jesus.  Kevin De Young’s…

Is Death the Cut-Off for Salvation?

Does the Bible talk about a second chance after death?  Is death the cut-off for salvation? Mark Driscoll addresses this appealing to Hebrews 9:27, “It is appointed once to die, and then judgment.”  He plainly states, “No.”  There is no hope once a person dies; their eternal destiny in Heaven…

My Steeple is Bigger than Your Steeple

Protestant Liberalism, Evangelicalism, post-Evangelicalism, radical revisionism (Sheesh, how many ism’s are there?), secularized theology, post-modern narrative theories, emergent narratives versus doctrinal assertions, churchspeakism, blah, blah, blah… I don’t mind getting technical when technical is necessary, but when Albert Mohler must devote so much of his book review to setting his reading…

You Can’t Kill God’s Idea

“Our cultural fascination with vampires […] runs the gamut from movies to romance novels,” says Russell D. Moore. “Our culture is fascinated, and yet repulsed, by blood. That’s why the flickering image of blood running down a shower drain is the scariest scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho.”  Moore’s talk about…